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Wound Healing Vitamins

Supplements to help promote faster healing time and reduction of discomfort and any bruising

After having periodontal regenerative and/or dental implant therapies our wounds will heal over period of time. The capacity of a wound to heal depends in part the overall health and nutritional status of the individual. Dietary modifications and nutritional and herbal supplements may improve the quality of wound healing by influencing these reparative processes or by limiting the damaging effects of inflammation.

What are the symptoms of wound healing?

Symptoms include swelling, stiffness, tenderness, discoloration, skin tightness, scabbing, itching, and scar formation.

Medical treatments (Prescriptions)

Prescription antibiotics may prescribed by Dr. Nejat prevent infection and thus promote healing. Anti inflammatory medication including (ibuprofen 600-800mg every 6 hours) or short term steroid therapy may be used to help control your postoperative swelling and thus reduce or eliminate your post treatment discomfort

Our mouths are generally not very clean. Keeping our mouth clean can be achieved by the use of Chlorhexidine (Peridex®) twice a day for 30 seconds. Make sure not to eat or rinse your mouth with any liquids for at lease 2 hours.

Nutritional supplements that may be helpful

Supplementation with bromelain, an enzyme derived from pineapple stem, prior to and following a surgical procedure has been shown to reduce swelling, bruising, healing time, and pain.3 Bromelain supplementation has also been shown to accelerate the healing of soft-tissue injuries in male boxers.4 The amount of bromelain used in these studies was 40 mg four times per day, in the form of enteric-coated tablets. Enteric-coating prevents the stomach acid from partially destroying the bromelain. Most currently available bromelain products are not enteric-coated, and it is not known if such products would be as effective as enteric-coated bromelain.

Collectively, the B-vitamins are essential for carbohydrate metabolism and energy production.* Some are facilitators of the energy-releasing reactions, while others help to deliver the oxygen and nutrients that allow the energy pathways to run. For optimal function, adequate amounts of all vitamins are needed. Vitamin B complex along with periodontal flap therapy resulted in significantly superior results when compared to placebo.(Neiva 2005)

Vitamin C is needed to make collagen (connective tissue) that strengthens skin, muscles, and blood vessels and to ensure proper wound healing. Severe injury appears to increase vitamin C requirements,8 and vitamin C deficiency causes delayed healing.9 Preliminary human studies suggest that vitamin C supplementation in non-deficient people can speed healing of various types of wounds and trauma, including surgery, minor injuries, herniated intervertebral discs, and skin ulcers.10 11 A combination of 1�3 grams per day of vitamin C and 200�900 mg per day of pantothenic acid has produced minor improvements in the strength of healing skin tissue.12 13

Vitamin K, named for the German word koagulation, has long been used to promote blood clotting and prevent bleeding, particularly in cases of aspirin poisoning or blood-thinner overdose. It's also a favorite among plastic surgeons, who use large doses on their patients to prevent post-surgery bruising.

Calcium is an essential mineral for a healthy body. 99% of calcium in our bodies is found in our bones. The simple fact is that if the body does not get the calcium that it needs, it can begin to draw away vital calcium already stored in the bones. Calcium is essential for teeth and building bones. To absorb calcium into our body vitamin D is needed. Our bodies can produce Vitamin D if our skin has sufficient exposure to the sun.

Zinc is a component of many enzymes, including some that are needed to repair wounds. Even a mild deficiency of zinc can interfere with optimal recovery from everyday tissue damage, as well as from more serious trauma.14 15 One controlled trial found the healing time of a surgical wound was reduced by 43% with oral supplementation of 30 mg of zinc three times per day, in the form of zinc sulfate.16

Whether oral zinc helps tissue healing when no actual zinc deficiency exists is unclear,17 but doctors often recommend 50 mg of zinc per day for four to six weeks to aid in the healing of wounds. Long-term oral zinc supplementation must be accompanied by copper supplementation to prevent a zinc-induced copper deficiency. Typically, if 30 mg of zinc are taken each day, it should be accompanied by 2 mg of copper. If 60 mg of zinc are used, it should be accompanied by 3 mg of copper each day.

Copper is a required cofactor for the enzyme lysyl oxidase, which plays a role in the cross-linking (and strengthening) of connective tissue.32 Doctors often recommend a copper supplement as part of a comprehensive nutritional program to promote wound healing. A typical amount recommended is 2�4 mg per day, beginning two weeks prior to surgery and continuing for four weeks after surgery.

Arginine supplementation increases protein synthesis and improves wound healing in animals.44 Two controlled trials have shown increased tissue synthesis in surgical wounds in people given 17�25 grams of oral arginine per day.45 46

Lysine is essential amino acids that cannot be made at all by the body or cannot be made in sufficient quantity to meet the body's physiological needs. It helps with prevention and the reduction of the duration of cold soars on the lips and oral ulcers.

Wound Healing Summary Chart
Rating Nutritional Supplements (oral) Dose Duration(from initial dose)
*** Bromelain
Accelerates the healing of soft-tissue &
the reduction of discomfort and bruising
200-500mg
(once a day)
2 weeks
*** Vitamin B-complex
Helps to deliver the oxygen and nutrients
At least 50mg of each type
(once a day)
1 month
*** Vitamin C
Strengthens skin, muscles, and blood vessels and to ensure proper wound healing
1000 mg
(once a day)
2 months
(start 14 days prior to treatment)
*** Vitamin K
Prevents bleeding and post-surgery bruising
100 micrograms
(once a day)
2 months
(start 7 days prior to treatment) *Discontinue if any bruising is seen
*** Calcium with vitamin D
Helps with mineralization of bone
1000mg
(once a day)
3 months
(start 14 days prior to treatment)
*** Zinc
Promotes with wound healing of soft and hard tissue
50 mg
(once a day) *Should be taken at least 2 hour after copper
4-6 weeks
(start 14 days prior to treatment)
** Copper
Promotes wound healing
4 mg
(once a day)
4-6 weeks
(start 14 days prior to treatment)
** Arginine
Promotes wound healing
1000 mg
(once a day)
2 months
(start 14 days prior to treatment)
** Lysine
Prevention and the reduction of the duration of cold soars on the lips and oral ulcers
1000 mg
(once a day)
2-3weeks
(start 7 days prior to treatment)
*** Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
** Preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

All of the supplements above can be found at GNC Stores

*The information above is used as a supplement to help your wound healing. Please do not continue this regiment beyond the indicated amount of time. (Unless instructed by your doctor)

It�s best to take the supplements 2 hours after taking any antibiotics and with food in your stomach (It may be easier to break the supplements into two groups and take them 1-2 hours apart.)

References

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